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Psychosocial factors are associated with the antibody response to both thymus-dependent and thymus-independent vaccines

Gallagher, Stephen and Phillips, Anna C. and Ferraro, Alastair J. and Drayson, Mark T. and Carroll, Douglas (2008) Psychosocial factors are associated with the antibody response to both thymus-dependent and thymus-independent vaccines. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 22 (4). pp. 456-460. ISSN 08891591

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URL of Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2007.10.018

Identification Number/DOI: doi:10.1016/j.bbi.2007.10.018

The present study examined the association between psychological stress, social support and antibody response to both thymus-dependent and thymus-independent vaccinations. Stressful life events in the previous year and customary social support were measured by standard questionnaires at baseline in 75 (41 females) healthy students. Antibody status was assessed at baseline, 4 and 18 weeks following vaccination with formaldehyde inactivated hepatitis A virus and pneumococcal polysaccharides, which induce thymus-dependent and -independent antibody responses respectively. Controlling for baseline antibody status, life event stress was negatively associated with antibody response to the hepatitis A vaccine at the 18-week follow-up; participants reporting a greater number of stressful life events had a poorer antibody response. There was no relationship between psychological stress and antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination. Social support was not associated with the antibody response to hepatitis A vaccination. However, there was a significant association between support and the antibody response to the thymus-independent pneumococcal vaccine at 4-week follow-up; participants with larger social networks mounted a better response. These relationships could not be accounted for by age and sex, or by variations in health behaviours. Psychosocial factors would appear to influence the response to both thymus-dependent and thymus-independent vaccines, but not in the same manner.

Type of Work:Article
Date:2008 (Publication)
School/Faculty:Colleges (2008 onwards) > College of Life & Environmental Sciences
Department:School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Subjects:GV Recreation Leisure
R Medicine (General)
Institution:University of Birmingham
Copyright Holders:Elsevier
ID Code:1190
Refereed:YES
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